Nicki the Neuron

NickyAfter I gave a presentation about my use of Neuron Stickers, Brain Surgeon & Wrinkle Sprinkles at Twitter Math Camp 15, Julie Wright (@julierwright) sent me a tweet that directed me to a stuffed Neuron with eyes. So Bitchen!

I took her suggestion and hung it at the front of the classroom as a class mascot, naming it Nicki the Neuron, since Nicki is a name that is gender and ethnic neutral.

Julie Wright Tweet

 

Nicki was  a bigger hit than I expected. One of my students insisted on holding our new mascot during class.

Nicky n Fan

This inspired me. I thought to give Nicki temporarily to the group to which the most recent Neuron Sticker was awarded. I was concerned the boys wouldn’t receive this too well, but Nicki quickly became of badge of honor for the groups.

Nicky n Girl

Nicki is now part of the responsibilities of the Brain Surgeon and is generating a great deal of focus on the Process Reward System that I am implementing. Thank you Julie!

Neuron Stickers, Brain Surgeons and Wrinkle Sprinkles

Brain-SurgeonI was inspired at a Growth Mindset workshop by Jo Boaler and Carol Dweck. I knew I was going to be teaching a class of at-risk students, qualified by being on the socio-economic disadvantaged list and having struggled in 8th grade math. Rather than repeating in high school the math course that they failed in middle school, these students would taking Algebra 1 with me. If there is a group of students that need help shifting from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset, it is a group of at-risk students who have struggled in math. However, I did not want to just put a bunch of Power Point slides saying how they should believe in themselves.

So, I came up with three vehicles to develop growth mindsets in my students:

Neuron Stickers

Dr. Boaler emphasizes the plasticity of the brain. This means that the brain actual rewires itself when it learns, by forming new or strengthening current connects between brain cells. We also know now that the outer later of the brain thickens as we learn, much like muscles get bigger from exercise. These facts create a contemporary view of the brain that is in direct opposition to the conventional view in education in which the brain is a passive vessel to be filled with knowledge. These two views are best contrasted by the following images of the brain.

Brain Pair

The image on the left implies that we are building a brain. I love that idea so much that I enlarged the graphic to poster size and put it up on the classroom wall. I tell my students that is exactly what they are here to do … build their brains. We then publicly discuss the actions that help us build our brains in class, like…

  • Sharing mistakes publicly
  • Offering unique solutions
  • Asking clarifying questions
  • Making connections
  • Having an “Aha!” moment
  • Helping others

To encourage these and other behaviors that contribute to learning, I created Neuron stickers. This was easy, I pulled a drawing of a neuron from the internet and created a sheet that I could print onto a sheet of mailing labels.

neuron color

Neuron Sheet

Each time a student demonstrated action that promoted learning, the student receives a neuron sticker which they get to place on the Brain Poster. Once the poster is filled, I put up a new one and we continue honoring growth mindset throughout the year.

Brain Color Brain Pic Final

Brain Surgeon

Each day we designate a “Brain Surgeon,” who serves as a class leader for the day. I purchased this model of the brain to be given to the day’s Brain Surgeon.

Brain Surgeon Model

The role of the Brain Surgeon comes at the beginning and end of each class.

Opening Class Duties

  • Supervise preparation for class (getting materials ready)
  • Lead Drum Roll (Class Opener)
  • Reading of Instructional Objective
  • Placing Nicki The Neuron with the group who had it last during prior lesson

Closing Class Duties

  • Supervise clean up and storing of materials
  • Return Nicki The Neuron and the Brain
  • Lead Wrinkle Sprinkle 

Wrinkle Sprinkle

Each class concludes with a debrief titled “Wrinkle Sprinkle,” implying that learning adds a new wrinkle to the brain. (Note: Anatomically we know this is not accurate, though we know that the neurons make new connections and the outer layer of the brain thickens.) The brain surgeon calls on students who raise a hand to offer something that they learned that day. These Wrinkle Sprinkles are recorded on the 180Blogs on this site. Wrinkle

 

Neuron Problems & Classroom Norms in Algebra 2

Day 3, Fri Aug 12, 2016

A vs Don-stepmom-shoulderTarget: Recognize that  Voice = Choice when it comes to having a growth mindset as we solve problems about our amazing brains.

Entrance Ticket
I greeted the students at the door, but today I was checking homework. They only had to do one problem of their choosing from the Neuron Facts last night. If they did not have it, they had to quickly do one outside. Message sent: You are doing your homework in this class.

Growth Mindset
On the growth mindset web site they make a point of the “voice = choice,” meaning that we have a choice whether or not to listen to the fixed mindset thoughts that we all have, They give a 4-step breakdown of how to shift from a fixed to a growth mindset. I had fun soliciting the help of a very ancient visual of a devil and an angel on your shoulder.

Voices choices

Neuron Fact Problems
So then came time to practice recognizing the fixed voice and talking to ourselves in the growth voice, while doing challenging math problems. They already sit in groups of four, so I had them spend the rest of the period working through the Neuron Fact Problems, which I created from the Facts on the front side of the paper.  They were to call out any fixed mindset words or actions demonstrated by their partners. They actually did. I worked the room with Neuron stickers and Nicki. I honored about half the groups. I was pleasantly surprised at how well my crew worked.

During the lesson, as I worked the groups, I asked  one student how she got her answer, and she told me that she had copied from her partner. I praised her for her honesty, then paused the class and brought their attention to our classroom norms.

Norms

These were originally shared with us by Dr. Juli Dixon (@thestrokeofluck) in a math training at our district. They became very popular among our teachers. Our new principal has implemented them schoolwide, providing posters for every classroom. I drew the students attention, that we “Share, Don’t Copy.” When we share, one person explains, the other listens, then question follow if we don’t understand or if we disagree. If these three norms are occurring then writing down someone else’s solution is not copying.

After a half hour of solid work, we debriefed where we saw evidence of a fixed mindset and where we saw evidence of a growth mindset. This whole activity was very well received by the students. I gave them advance notice that Monday we will be debriefing their actual solutions to the problems.

Wrinkle Sprinkle

  • Share, Don’t Copy.
  • The equals about 3 lbs.

Introductions & Neuron Facts in Algebra 2


neuron vertical
Day 2, Thurs Aug 11, 2016

The Brain Surgeon
Today, we began my regular routine of designating a daily Brain Surgeon. Since this was our first day of the Brain Surgeon, I introduced the routines of the Drum Roll, Reading of the Dual Target, Music Cues, and the Wrinkle Sprinkle. The students seem to embrace the spirit of of it all.

Student Introductions
As with every new school year, I had each student briefly state their name and something interesting about themselves. When they were all done,  I recited all their names. That always impresses a class. Then I told them things about myself. I state that yesterday we started with math, because that is what we are all about here. But since I teach math to them, they are also important and I need to know who they are.

Growth Mindset
Most of our Course Teams across the district agreed to do some kind of growth mindset activity. Here was mine.

I started by summarizing the plethora of lists of fixed vs growth mind set statements with two pictures. I told the students that research in student learning is showing that self-perception of talent as a limit or as a starting point has a tremendous influence on their learning.

Talent Wall

Then I shared that scans of the brain of someone with a fixed mindset versus a growth mindset, shows something very interesting. When faced with a challenge, the fixed mindset brain “goes cold.” It literally shuts down. However, when faced with the same challenge, the growth mindset brain “fires up.” It knows that more is being asked of it, so it kicks into high gear to meet the challenge, rather than duck it.
Brain MindsetsNow it was time to test out where we see ourselves demonstrating  a fixed or growth mindset.

Neuron Facts
I gave the students the worksheet with the Neuron Facts on the front side. I found these on the internet and thought they would make for a good lesson since they highlight the amazing function of our brains. I added the subheadings of Fast, Crowded ,etc. I started with a common practice of mine Notice & Wonder popularized by Annie Fetter (@MFAnnie) of Math Forum.  My Gradual Reel-In process looked something like this:

  1. You Do: Independent response.
  2. Ya’ll Do: Each member of the group shares both their notice and wonder.
  3. We Do: Each group decides on one Notice and one Wonder from those shared. These get shared out by each group as I write them on the board.
  4. I Do: I summarize the major point(s) that I want all students walking out with. Here it was the process of Noticing and Wondering and how we facilitate group discussion in class… And of course how amazing our brains are.

The groups were then tasked with doing one problem together. Homework was to do one more.

Wrinkle Sprinkle
Tying into the concept of the plasticity of the brain, I joke that when we learn we get a new wrinkle on the brain. Each class then concludes with what we learned that day. The brain surgeon leads and records the discussion. The students today stated that they learned…

  • Negative thoughts shut down your brain
  • Speed of the brain cell
  • The amount of oxygen the brain uses

First Day – Algebra 2

Day 1, Wed  Aug 10, 2016

{I am new to Chaparral High School, having transferred within my district as a Math Specialist.}

Opening Quiz Alg 2 on the 6Cs: After greeting each student at the door with a high-5, I started the year by answering the transformation question: “How will you (the students) be different in June than you are now, because of my class?” I am still answering that question with the same 6Cs that I launched 2 years ago. My Claims-Based grading system and the students portfolios are structured as such also.

6 Cs PicAs I do with all classes each year, I gave the students the blank copy of the quiz below, and told them this was not to be graded nor was it a test of their previous knowledge. It was like a movie trailer of things to come, but I still wanted them to give me their best shot. I then gave them my standard 3-response speech.

As a mathematician I cannot always give an accurate response; I cannot always give a complete response; but I can always, always, always give an intelligent response. Blank is not intelligent.

I pressed them to give me something… numbers, equations, drawings … anything intelligent.

Opening Quiz Alg 2 Pic

They worked on these independently, then in groups, then as a class, followed by my summary. I wanted to model this process of “gradual reel-in” (as opposed to gradual release) right away, because I use it often.

During the class discussion, one senior claimed out loud, “This is the 5th time that I have taken this class!” (She had failed two semesters as a junior, then 2 semesters in summer school.) I told her that this year she will pass because, “You are that smart, and I am that good.” I had the students repeat this:

Me: “You are that …”
Class: …smart!”
Me: “I am that …”
Class: “…good!”

This was a set-up for the Growth Mindset discussion that was coming over the next few days. In the meantime, I hope I sent the message that I believe in them, and that I believe in my ability to teach them (The 3 Growth Mindsets).

The students brought some terrific energy. I’m so looking forward to my first year as a Puma.

Re-Cap: Twitter Math Camp 16

TMC LogoThe annual Twitter Math Camp is always amazing. This summer’s conference in Minneapolis, at Augsburg College. was no different. My great disappointment was only being able to stay for one full day this year, but the one day did not disappoint. 

As always, portions the Math Twitter Blogosphere (#MTBoS) rallied from around the country in genuine excitement to see and learn from each other after another year of digital friendship and collaboration. Thanks go out to Lisa Henry (@lmhenry9) for being the lead on this terrifically special event.


A “JUST ENOUGH” APPROACH TO INTERVENTION (Session)
Michelle NMichelle Naidu (@park_star),
Saskatchewan Professional Development Unit

A packed room on the topic of intervention was surprising to both me and the presenter, because the MTBoS dialogue mostly revolves around first instruction. The large audience is a testament, though, to the need for reaching ALL kids in the era of 21st Century Standards. Michelle is leading a very successful intervention program in Canada which is focusing on some basic premises:

Differentiating for All Students is like Cowboys Herding Cats, but “it’s a good feeling having the herd [of students] arrive on time without losing a one.”

Early Intervention on the Pre-Requisite Skills (Readiness) that are required to be successful in the current curriculum is the first and most important intervention move. Pre-Assessments on prior content are then necessary to help improve students’ chances for success. Back at home we call this Boot Camp. Michelle affirmed that this work is good, and also inspired me to go back to my site and push to make it a priority.

Unpacking Standards Collaboratively serves two purposes. (1) It allows you to throw out material that is not in the standards, which buys you time for intervention/differentiation (Grade Level)  and (2) It helps you focus on the pre-requisite skills needed for students to learn the new material (Readiness).

Intervening on Readiness = Differentiated Content
Intervening on Grade Level = Differentiated Product

SnowballI also saw an interesting take on the Snowball Activity. Students write down one comment and one question about a topic (notice and wonder), then wad up their papers and throw them around the room. Each student picks up a “snowball” and adds another comment and question. This is done again, until there are three of each. After the fourth toss of the snowballs, the students do not write, but instead debrief publicly as the teacher summarizes the comments and questions on the board. This is a strong way to have ALL students reflect on learning.


KEYNOTE: RACE, MATH AND WHAT WE’RE NOT TALKING ABOUT
Jose Vilson (@TheJLV)JoseV
educolor.org

Jose’s most solid point was that public conversation on math education reform often does not include educators, especially those teaching the marginalized. He accurately stated that if the medical system in America were being discussed on cable news, there would be a doctor on the show, but you never see a teacher on TV talking about education.

In many ways, Jose was calling us out to be activist on our campuses for the changes that we in the Blogosphere write so much about, particularly for students of color. He made a claim that really stuck with me: “We say that we teach math to all kids, but students of color are taught a different type of math than white students.” I know this is true on my campus, While my school is relatively diverse, the lower-level math classes are disproportionately populated by students with Hispanic surnames.

I asked a question of Jose, preluding it with a statement that prejudice on my campus tends to run more along income lines than racial lines (although, racism exists everywhere). Students are accepted and succeed as long as they behave like ‘these kids.’ So I asked, “How do you get teachers and staff to be more accepting of ‘those kids,’ so that they can remain authentically themselves and still learn?” Jose’s response was, “Teach the adults to recognize ‘different types of genius.'” I love that phrase! He went on to explain that kids in poverty are often times going to bring the norms of their own sub-culture to class, which is many times in conflict with the rigid, quite, patient, controlled environment of traditional school. If we can respect that and honor ALL students’ intellects, while also teaching proper social behavior, schools will break down a lot of walls and reach more marginalized students.


AudreySTUDENT-CREATED GEOGEBRAS
Audrey McLaren (@a_mcsquared),

Audrey showed samples of student work from her classes, in which she has students BUILD activities and graphs in GeoGebra and Desmos. The best example was Sticky Points. I love how the challenging of students to create the special points for a function like the x-intercept(s), the y-intercept, and the vertex demands that the students do some algebraically manipulation. The graph offers an immediate feedback loop until students do it correctly. This builds their algebra skills and conceptual understanding simultaneously. I’m using this idea in my class this year for sure.

Desmos Sticky points


WHAT IS MATHEMATICAL MODELING?
Edmund Harris (@Gelada) and Myself (@MathProjects)

Edmund Model.png
I thought Dr. Harris asked for “mathematician modeling!”

I was honored when Dr. Harris, of the University of Arkansas, asked me to present with him on Mathematical Modeling. Edmund and I have been friends since our first Twitter Math Camp (TMC13), and I always look forward to our laughs and deep mathematical conversations. Edmund wanted to share the theoretical meaning of mathematical modeling, and he asked me to add my take on how the teaching of it manifests in the classroom.

Logo Pear DeckWe started by surveying the audience on Pear Deck, prompting for their definitions of mathematical modeling. The vast majority of the responses fell into two categories:

  • Representing a Real-Life Situation
  • Applying the representation to make Predictions.

It turns out that these are quite accurate if we include them BOTH, but the two are not necessarily a comprehensive list, as Edmund explained.

The professor started by claiming that shepherds in the field used to count sheep by using stones in their pocket by which a small stone represents one sheep and a larger stone represents 20 sheep. This, he asserted, is an example of abstract modeling. (Leave it to the Brit to bring sheep herding into a math discussion.) Then he drew this diagram on the board:

Edmunds Model Diagram

Edmund teachingHe explained that you start with “something to be modeled,” (noticed he did not say a real-life situation) and then you create an abstract representation of it. This is a back-and-forth process of verifying the accuracy of the model’s description of the something as well as the “thing” that we want to do with it. (Use rocks to keep track of the sheep). So the audience was responses were spot on… collectively. Yes, modeling is Representation AND Application, but not necessarily just Representation OR Application. Furthermore, Edmond wanted to make it clear that modeling does not have to apply to only “real-world” examples. He claims that when we discuss the transformations of a family of functions, we are also modeling… using an abstract representation to “do something” to the original parent function.

Modeling Tweet Me

In my investigating of what is expected of school teachers when it comes to modeling, I studied the common core documents and found very persistent, clearly defined attributes of Mathematical Modeling:

  1. Modeling is a process.
  2. Modeling is a verb.

In other words, using a model that is already provided is a good and healthy step in the learning process of modeling, but it is not modeling itself unless the students are generating the model themselves.

Modeling Tweet Heather

Modeling Tweet Jasmine

Thank you, Edmund. It was a pleasure working with you, my friend. You always make math appear so joyful.


THE SIDE TALKS
I had several conversations throughout the Camp, but two that stood out were with …

Math Modeling
Edmund Harris (@Gelada), Brian Miller (@TheMillerMath) & Alex Wilson (@fractallove314)

TMC Bar ModelingThe first night of TMC16 was a huge social event by Desmos. Edmund, Brian, Alex and I had a beer-laden discussion about modeling that proved quite passionate (read as: table pounding, finger-pointing, and all in good fun B.S. calling). It was such a blast to throw ideas around with people of high intelligence, strong convictions and the deep desire to get this thing that we call teaching right. Cheers to changing the world one math lesson at a time.

Intellectual Need for VocabularyPic Dan M
Dr. Dan Meyer
 (@ddmeyer):
Dr. Meyer completed his dissertation last year. Knowing how much those with a doctorate enjoy talking about their research, and being truly curious about it, I ask him to share his findings with me. He joyfully did, including some of the back story behind it. In essence, Dan studied the effectiveness of giving students the academic vocabulary after first posing a task that required its use, rather than front loading the terms. He called this method Functionary. His study showed that the both Functionary (using the vocabulary to communicate) and Traditional methods (making flash cards to memorize definitions) were equally effective in teaching students academic language found on traditional assessments. The Functionary method, however, showed superior results when students were asked to communicate their thinking using the vocabulary terms or to complete less traditional (more CCSS-like) tasks. You can listen to the Defense of his Dissertation on Dan’s Blog


As always, I highly recommend this event to any math teacher. I hope to see you all at Twitter Math Camp in  Atlanta, July 27-30 2017.

How Deep for Teachers?

 

26570883 - flood level depth marker post with rain falling into the surrounding waterRecently, I conducted a training with a school district in West Virginia.  It was for new teachers (1st-3rd Year) in all subjects K-12. There were approximately 75 participants and 20 mentors. One of our activities dealt with Depth of Knowledge. I showed the typical D.O.K., but I wanted them to have a more meaningful experience with D.O.K. levels in mathematics.

DOK Chart

The activity I created was inspired by the work of Robert Kaplinsky. I love his Tools to Distinguishing Between Depth of Knowledge Levels. I particularly like his example of sums of whole numbers:DOK RK sampleThis is a simple and clear example of the D.O.K. progression. However, it does not show D.O.K. Level 4, so I contacted Robert and he directed me to this Problem Post of his, How Many Soda Combos are There on a Coke Freestyle Machine? 

DOK Soda

Perfect! I compiled these four into one document, scrambling the order, and asked the teachers to discuss the problems in their table groups and to assign a D.O.K. level exclusively to each one. I was intrigued at how different their responses were compared to what Robert (and myself) considered the problems to be. I noted that the group was a broad range of grade levels and subject areas, so I thought I would conduct the same activity with a collection of high school math teachers that I was scheduled to train in California  the following week. I was very curious if math teachers would view the problems differently than non-math teachers. Indeed, they did. However, they also disagreed with Robert and me. Below, are the all responses from the groups at each training, as well as Robert’s determination. Notice the variety of responses that was generated within each training.

DOK RK Response

The choices that earned  the most votes looked like this.

DOK RK tops

Notice that there is not a single example in which all three parties agree. I have no profound analysis of these results; I am simply sharing this very curious experience. I am still pondering the outcomes and their meaning many times over. So much so, that whenever I hear the phrase “D.O.K.,” I smirk and scratch my head.

Roatan: Math in Honduras

RoatanIn June of 2015, I was privileged to join my wife and several other swim school owners on a service trip to the island of Roatan, in Honduras. The purpose of the trip was to provide much-needed toys & supplies to some of the public schools there, and to raise physical fitness awareness.

Of the nearly fifty swim school owners, instructors and family members that made up our group, I was the only school teacher, therefore, I viewed the experience through a different lens than the others. I also made several connections with the teachers and was able to observe one do an outstanding job of teaching 1-digit subtraction. Watch the video below and you will be as equally impressed. The surprise for me was learning later that the class was 4th grade (in the U.S. this topic is taught in 2nd).

Video Link

Video Still Roatan

My Guest Lesson

I also had a unique opportunity to teach a brief high school math lesson. I could see on the board that the lesson was about the surface area of a sphere. The teacher had written the formula A = 4πr² and there was an example showing how to calculate the area given the radius. I saw the students doing guided practice in their notebooks. The teacher learned that I also taught math and offered to have me show something on the board. From her limited English, the teacher translated for me. I kept it simple, checking for understanding via head nods after each step… I drew a sphere, then a hemisphere, then the Great Circle. I asked how many of these circles would it take to cover the surface of the sphere. We took a finger vote. Most of the class claimed “2.” I claimed that the teacher already showed them… in the formula … 4 circles (πr²). I then applauded the teacher for knowing that. (You can see me building her up to her students, in the picture below. They all applauded her.)

Shore Teaching2

Half Moon Bay

 

Schools in Roatan

25% of all Roatan children do not have the means to attend to school. Of those that do, 30% do not continue beyond the 6th grade. This will change as the economy improves. Thirty years ago, there was no electricity and no paved roads on the island. Progress on Roatan has a strong upward trajectory that can be accelerated with a little bit of help.

Kids on roofFlowers Baycrawfish orck

Our 2015 Visit

We visited six schools:

  • Victor Stanley West End School
  • Froylan Turcios School
  • Escuela Juan Lindo
  • Garby Nelson
  • Thomas McField
  • Isidro Sabio

We provided donations from the swim school owners and from the clients of the schools.The outpouring of generousity was amazing. The supplies ranged from desks to soccer balls to toothbrushes to backpacks.

Chair donation

Table stuff

BDay Girl

Another intention of the trip was to provide physical fitness awareness. The kids had a great deal of fun with both the new exercises and the activities.

Race

Push ups

Many of the students greeted us warmly. We learned that many kids had not seen pictures of themselves, so they got a kick out of us showing them their images on our phones.

Cute Kids

Casie n Girls

 

The trip ended with the Swim Celebration on the beach at Half Moon Bay in the West End. I was surprised on an island how children didn’t know how to float. The lessons were readily accepted, as was the swimming gear (swim suits, intertubes and goggles). As you can see, my wife fell in love with the Honduran children.

Water Baby crop

Our group will be returning to the amazing land and people of Roatan in the summer of 2017.

Twitter Math Camp 15 Re-Cap

What happens at Twitter Math Camp never stays at Twitter Math Camp! 

TMC logoHow can it? We all met through Twitter, speak through blogs, ride a communal wave of a passion, ache to change the world through math education, and respond to the annual call of Lisa Henry (@lmhenry9) to gather each summer for the most exhilarating, unique and educational professional development event that any of us have ever experienced. Collectively, we form the universe know as the Math Twitter Blogosphere (#MTBoS). With this kind of excited learning and a vehicle to share it loudly with the world, there is no way to keep TMC a secret. 

So in this passionate, collaborative, spirit, here is my Re-Cap of TMC15

{Note: All videos shown here were recorded by Richard Villanueva}


GOING DEEPER WITH DESMOS Session
Jed Butler (@MathButler), Michael Fenton (@mjfenton), Glenn Waddell (@gwaddellnvhs), Bob Lochel (@BobLoch)

Desmos Team

The “Morning Sessions” of the Camp consisted of 2-hour sessions that ran each of the first three days. Each 3-morning session was based on a topic. I attended the one on Desmos, the premier, free, online, graphing calculator. This was an enormously productive time that inspired me to SCHEDULE in advance, where and when to use Desmos in my curriculum this year. Here’s what I learned about Desmos ….

  1. Tours: These are built-in tutorials that walk you through the Desmos basics of Graphing Equations, Creating Tables, Lines of Regression, and Restrictions (domain & range). Just click the question mark in the upper-right corner.
    Pic Tours
  2. Desmos Bank: A communal site where teachers can share Desmos ideas and activities.
  3. Activity Builder: Eli Luberoff (@eluberoff), the founder and CEO of Desmos made a guest appearance at our session to announce the launch of the Activity Builder. In essence, this allows teachers to create lessons, constructed of a sequence of Desmos activities. Trust me, YOU WANT TO CHECK THIS OUT.
  4. Student Accounts: If students have a Google account (which all of mine do), they can log into Desmos through Google, which allows them to save their work and send their products to the teacher. That’s going to happen in my class this year.

GEOMETRY, Not an IslandJasmine
Jasmine Walker, (@jaz_math), Burlington, Vermont

Jasmine started her session with a statement that I very much agreed with: “Even if your school or district has not adopted an integrated curriculum, you should still teach geometry as if it has. Geometry is not an island; we should not leave algebra behind.”

She then posed the question, “How do you start the year in Geometry?” for which the room had a very uniform answer … with vocabulary. This led the conversation on how to start the year with rich math tasks that link algebra to geometry. There was not a great deal of time for solutions, but the conversation brought me back to the Desmos activity builder. Geometry, Algebra & Vocabulary can all be brought together with a Desmos activity in which students need to generate geometric shapes on a coordinate plane, with restricted equations.


WHAT DO YOU THINK AND WHY? Supporting Students in Sharing their Ideas
Dr. Ilana Horn (@tchmathculture)

Dr. Horn spurred a terrific conversation among a large audience about how we, the various teachers in the room, support students in the sharing of their thinking in math class. The class had some wonderful ideas, however, what struck me most was not anyone idea, but the fact that so many ideas existed in a collective body of teachers. It truly is not a matter of knowledge, but a matter of will in getting students to work together and discuss their ideas. I was also impressed in Dr. Horn’s use of Polls Everywhere. I saw the power of the simulataneous viewing of the classes’ thoughts. I have been contemplating the use of Pear Deck (a similar platform) in my class.

TMC Poll


Teaching the 8 Practices
Me! (@MathProjects)

I taught a session on teaching the 8 Standards of Mathematical Practice, in which I shared my SMP Posters, their corresponding Wordles, and the explicit teaching of the practices through “Dual Targets.” (my blog post forthcoming)  Meg Craig (@mathymeg07) posted about the implementation of #SMPTargets in her own classroom.

SMP Posters MPJ 1_Page_7


Growing Our Practice  (Keynote #1)
Dr. Ilana Horn (@tchmathculture)
(video Part 1, Part 2)

Lani PicDr. Horn is well known for studies on teacher collaboration as well as student collaboration, therefore, she often talks about how teachers think about teaching. She once again delivered on that point through the lens of how teachers’ perspectives affect their professional growth, parsing out the difference between good teachers and great teachers into three key qualities:

  • Problem Frames
  • Representations of Practice
  • Interpretive Principles

The great teachers have …

  • Problem Frames that are actionable,
  • Representations of Practice that include more student voice and perspective, and
  • Interpretive Principles that focus on connections among teaching, mathematics and student understanding

In other words, great teachers do not spend a lot of time and energy discussing things they have no control over; rather, they ponder how students think about and interact with mathematics, and what how the lessons and activities affect their learning. So Dr. Horn called for …

  • Teacher Agency
  • Empathic Reasoning
  • Ecological Thinking

This resonated throughout a room full of people bent on “growing their practice.”


Math From the Heart, Not the Textbook (Keynote #2)
Christopher Danielson (@Trianglemancsd)
(video Part 1, Part 2)

Christopher laid down the inspirational challenge: “Find what you love. Do more of that.” He shared with us how he loves ambiguity and, therefore, was OK with playing the game of Which One Doesn’t Belong? For example, what students would choose and why in the set of four figures below, will offer up multiple answers.
TMC which oneChristopher is also the author of Common Core Math for Parents for Dummies. A much needed resource in responding to the darkside of social media.

“Find what you love. Do more of that.” — Christopher Danielson


Screen Shot 2015-07-24 at 3.05.23 PMTeacher Woman  (Keynote #3)
Fawn Nguyen, (@fawnpnguyen)
(video Part 1, Part 2)

Fawn did here what Fawn does best: She made us all feel wonderful about being teachers. She humorously poked fun at the tweets that many of us sent her, but also seriously shared her personal trimphs and tragedies. In the end, our diminutive twiter celebrity grew huge with inspiration. She tearfully read a complimentary letter from a grateful student, and then told us of her sister who is an engineer. An emotional Fawn, claimed “She makes more money than me,  but she doesn’t have that letter!”

“She makes more money than me, but she doesn’t have that letter!” — Fawn Nguyen


My Favorites
Several times throughout the Camp, there is time given for people to share a 5-10 minute presentation of a technique, activity or routine that they love. There were nearly two dozen amazing ideas.

Two of them I have already implemented in my class …

High 5’sGlenn Waddell (@gwaddellnvhs): Glenn was right. Offering the High 5’s at the door does more for my mood and mental preparation for the class than it did for the kids.

Music Cues, Matt Vaudry (@MrVaudrey): Playing Mission Impossible at the beginning of class and the Benny Hill Theme song at the end has drastically improved the time spent retrieving and cleaning up materials.

and two others I intend to use in the future …

Egg Roulette, Bob Lochel (@BobLoch): This looks to be a very engaging activity on probability and on making and critiquing conjectures.

Student Videos, Princess Choi, (@MathPrincessC): Having students make videos on math concepts, and then post them to a place where they may “like” and “comment” on each others is cutting edge.

I presented two of my own Favorites …

Neuron Stickers, Brain Surgeons & Wrinkle Sprinkles:  These are vehicles that that I used to cultivate a Growth Mindset in my students last year. (my blog post forthcoming) @mathymeg07 blogged about Strengthening a Dendrite and how to get inexpensive posters made.

Rally for Roatan: A pitch for the altruistic effort to bring textbooks and instructional supplies to the school district of Roatan, Honduras, and the roll-out of my new web page to support it.


MATH COACHES Roundtable
Chris Shore (@MathProjects), John Stevens (@Jstevens009), Chris Harris (@CHarrisMath), Hedge (@approx_normal), Jennifer Bell (@jkjohnsonbell), Nanette Johnson (@Math_m_Addicts), Robert Kaplinsky (@robertkaplinsky), Shelley Carranza (@stcarranza)

We eight math coaches had a wonderfully transparent roundtable discussion of what was working and not working at our sites. I was helpful to hear about so many successes, and to know that we shared many of the same issues. Listed below are the bulleted notes from that exchange.

“How do I move teachers along the WHY train?” — Nanette Johnson

Successes

  • 100% Handshake Introduction
    (Introduce self to every math teacher with a handshake)
  • Modeled Number Talks in 150 classes in 2 months
  • Acceptance of math coach at 16 schools
  • Teacher input (What do you think?)
  • Liaison/Advocate for teachers with District
  • Teacher invitation and openness
  • Self-Growth
  • Started Math Coach Network
  • Led Textbook adoption
  • Model Lessons (Geogebra, Desmos)
  • Teacher understanding of Common Core as teaching students to “Think & Communicate”

Resources:

  • #educoach: Wed 7pm Pacific
  • #k12mathcoach: 2nd & 4th Wed 6pm Pacific
    (starting in August 2015)
  • #elemmathchat: Thurs 6pm Pacific

Issues

  • Dismal lack of content knowledge in some cases
  • Missing teaching in the classroom
  • Coaching is more about psychology than math.
  • Drinking from a firehose, but only able to spit it back out
  • How do we collect data on effectiveness
    (Woodruff scale: 10 things)

Burning Questions:

  • How do I move teachers along the WHY train?
  • How do I use Behavior Economics to nudge change?
  • How do you measure effectiveness of PD?
  • What data do we have to show that we are effective?
  • How do I support myself at my getting better at my job?

The Side Talks
I had several conversations throughout the Camp, but two that stood out were with …

Dr HornLani Horn (@tchmathculture): We finally had our long overdue conversation about the structure of collaborative student groups. Dr. Horn wrote THE book on this topic, Strength in Numbers. I have always used a great deal of group work, and recently Lani’s emphasis on “status” in the class has influenced my thinking a great deal. We had the controversial discussion regarding grouping homogeneously, heterogeneously or randomly which finally settled the issue in my mind. I will share the results of that dialogue in a future post. #cliffhanger

Edmund PicEdmund Harris (@Gelada): Edmund and I love comparing American & British education systems. (Dr. Harris is originally from Britain and now teaches at the University of Arkansas). This year, he was very hot on the treatment of homework in both countries. He insists that rather than it being either the traditional, boring rote or the new, mind-crushing, “common core” problems that end up on haters’ Facebook pages, that math homework should be a “joyful meditation.” I love this thought; now comes the challenge of making it happen for my students.

Edmund also is the Illustrator of a new book coming out, Patterns of the Universe, A Coloring Adventure in Math and Beauty. He is my go-to expert for anything that deals with Geometry, so I cannot wait until this book comes out. The preview below of his illustrations will get you just as excited.

“Homework should be joyful, meditation.” — Dr. Edmund Harris


TMC15 was a phenomenal four days at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California. TMC16 will be at Augsberg College in Minneapolis,MN, July 16 – 19. I can’t wait to reconvene with this crew, so that, as one participant shouted …

“My brain will explode with awesomeness!”

TMC Group

And just for kicks …

 

Portfolios & Music Cues – Geometry

Day 3, Fri Aug 14, 2015

Cover Portfolio GeomMusic Cues: I heard this great idea from Matt Vaudry at Twitter Math Camp ’15, on using music cues for certain transitions and activities. Matt uses MANY different songs, but I choose to use only three:

1) The Mission Impossible theme song for preparing for class: My students each have a Portfolio (3-Ring Binders), a workbook, and a whiteboard. Each pair of students has a “Tool Kit.” All of these must be at their desks, plus their cell phones must be placed face down on the outside corner of the desk. Matt gives them one minute of the song; since my students have to retrieve materials from the portcase, I give them two minutes.

2) The Benny Hill theme song for cleaning up: They must get everything put away and sit back in their desks, so we can debrief the lesson (The Brain Surgeon’s Wrinkle Sprinkle)

3) The Dun-Dun-DUN sound for announcing the instructional target. (Which we will start next week.)

We practiced these back to back a few times until we got it down. It works amazingly well! Thank you Matt.

Portfolios: I require students to keep a portfolio in class. The portfolio has a cover sheet that intentionally refers to them as “Genetically-Coded Math Experts.” I used today to reinforce the 6 C’s as our ultimate goal of the course, which I introduced yesterday. The portfolio is structured around these six values as is my grade book. My students from last year, received their portfolios back from Algebra 1; the new students received a free binder from an anonymous donor. We built the portfolios section by section.

I saved the students the grief of going through the syllabus. I gave them the Course Overview to read on their own (which they won’t) and have their parent’s sign (they won’t read it either) and return to their portfolios by the end of next week. Rather than bore them with the grading policies all at once, I discuss them briefly when they arise in class. (e.g. Discuss homework when the first homework assignment is assigned.)

Wrinkle Sprinkle

  • The 6 C’s
  • We are going to learn how to think
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