Get to the Core of The Core

apple coreThe Common Core curriculum can basically be summed up in the following sentence:

Teach your students to THINK and COMMUNICATE their thinking.

Thinking and communicating are the 21st Century skills. Many people believe that the skills of the future involve the competent use of technology. While it is true that using digital tools in school and the work place is the new reality, it is actually the proliferation of technology that makes thinking and communicating imperative in the information age. When all the knowledge of humankind is available at anyone’s fingertips, memorizing information becomes far less important than being able to construct, evaluate and apply it. You can Google information; you cannot Google thinking.

So the core of the Core truly is Thinking & Communicating.

To make my case for this, I would like to pose that the following equation

6 + 4 + 4 + 8 = 22

be adjusted to

6 + 4 + 4 + 8 = 21

Before you start shouting that everything you have read on Facebook about the Common Core is true, let me declare that I am using this equation simply as a teaching device, not a true mathematical statement. You will understand what I mean after I present my evidence.

6 Shifts

Let me start my case that the core of the Core is Thinking & Communicating with the 6 Shifts, which are best represented by the following document found at Engage NY.

6 Shifts

In essence, these shifts are redefining rigor. Old school rigor was defined as sitting quietly taking notes, and completing long homework assignments in isolation. The new school definition of rigor envelops the last 4 shifts on the list: Fluency, Deep Understanding, Applications, and Dual Intensity. The rigor is now placed on the students’ minds instead of on their behinds.

The shifts are also calling for balance. Dual Intensity insists on both procedural fluency AND critical thinking by the students at a high level. It is not about dual mediocrity or about throwing the old out for the new, but a rich coupling of both mechanics and problem solving.

Therefore, I make the case that:
                     6 Shifts = 21st Century Skills,
which are to
                     Think & Communicate.

4 C’s

Another list that is framing much of the Common Core dialoge is the 4 C’s. Resources for this list can be found at Partnership for 21st Century Learning (p21.org).

4 C'sThese C’s redefine school…

The old school definition: A place where young people go to watch old people work.

The new school definition: A place where old people go to teach young people to think.

… and they redefine learning.

The difference of old school vs new school learning can best be contrasted by the following images of the brain.

Brain Chillin   Brain Build

The image on the left shows a passive brain that just hangs out as we stuff it with esoteric trivia. The image on the right shows a brain being built, symbolizing its plasticity. We now know that when the brain learns, its neurons make new connection with each other. In other words, learning literally builds the brain. The 4 C’s  claim that this building involves the capacity of the students’ brains to Critically Think, Communicate, Create and Collaborate.

Therefore, I make the case that:
                     4 C’s = 21st Century Skills
which are to
                     Think & Communicate.

4 Claims

Smarter Balance creates it’s assessments based on 4 Claims. (I teach in California. PARCC has 4 Claims that closely align to those of SBAC.)

SBAC

4 Claims

Notice that Claims #2 & 3 are explicitly stated as Thinking & Communicating, which also overlaps with two of the 4 C’s. Mathematical modeling is #4, which will be discussed later. I want to point out here that Claim #1 reinforces our idea of Dual Intensity from the 6 shifts.

There are two important notes for teachers about this first claim. 1) It says Concepts and Procedures, not just procedures. The students need to know the why not just the how. 2) The Procedures alone account for about 30% of the new state tests, so if we continue to teach as has been traditionally done in America, we will fail to prepare our students for the other 70% of the exam which will assess their conceptual understanding as well as their abilities in problem solving, communicating and modeling.

Therefore, I make the case that:
                     4 Claims = 21st Century Skills
which are to
                     Think & Communicate.

8 Practices

If you open the Common Core Standards for Mathematics, the first two pages of the beastly document contain a detailed description of the Standards of Mathematical Practice. Then at the beginning of each of the grade level sections for the Standards of Content you will find 8 Practices summarized in the grey box shown below.
8 practicesWhat do you notice about the list? Indeed, these habits of mind all involve Thinking & Communicating. While the content standards change with each new grade level, the practice standards do not. With each year of school the students are expected to get better at these 8 Practices. Notice that the first half of the list has already been included in the ones discussed previously: Problem Solving, Communicating Reasoning, Constructing Viable Arguments and Modeling. A case is often made that the other four are embedded in these first four. However one might interpret the list, “Memorize and Regurgitate” is not on there.

Therefore, I make the case that:
                     8 Practices = 21st Century Skills
which are to
                     Think & Communicate.

The Sum of the Numbers

So, as you can now see, the 6 Shifts, the 4 C’s, the 4 Claims and the 8 Practices are all focused on the 21st Century Skills of Thinking & Communicating. Therefore, I can finally, explain my new equation …

Since,

    6 Shifts
    4 C’s
    4 Claims
+  8 Practices
= 21st Century Skills

then 6 + 4 + 4 + 8 = 21!

None of these numbers represents a list of content, because the content changes brought on by the Common Core, while significant, are actually no big deal in the long run. A few years from now we won’t remember all the fuss regarding Statistics and Transformations, but we will all spend the rest of our careers learning how to teach kids to Think & Communicate.

I rest my case.

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2 thoughts on “Get to the Core of The Core”

  1. No wonder kids are confused. Pedagogical BS and nonsensical eduspeak. It’s interesting that decades ago, those who put men on the moon didn’t learn math using these methods. Glad you have rested your case. I hope it remains buried.

  2. Joanne, This article speaks of standards, not pedagogy. The Common Core calls for people to support their arguments with evidence. I invite you back to do the same here.

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